Orbit Blog

Orbit Analytics  |   June 2, 2017

Ubiquitous  adjective  /yo͞oˈbikwədəs/

Definition: Present, appearing, or found everywhere.

‘Everywhere’ has been the ‘state of Business Intelligence’ for several years now. Most solution vendors now include some form of reporting (‘BI lite’) in their offering to at least enable generation of metrics supporting the value they provide. In addition to those capabilities, at the last count Gartner’s latest “FrontRunners for BI” list included over 200 platform vendors, only 33 of which earned the right to be highlighted in their graphics. Selection of those 33 was based on capabilities, solicited user input, and of course ‘pay to play’, where these organizations decided to invest significant resources to ensure Gartner analysts were extremely familiar with them and that they were favorably represented in the study. For those vendors, a significant focus on ‘vision’ is mandatory, with less emphasis on ‘execution’, to become and remain a ‘leader’.

 

Here at ORBIT Analytics, our focus is on ‘execution’, we approached the development of our ORBIT BI platform with a very specific focus on you.

We set the objectives of:

  1. Meeting the specific demands of the Oracle ERP community with comprehensive pre-built reports and data models, including the ability to migrate content from their legacy tools such as Discoverer into our platform seamlessly.
  2. Provide more than the minimum functional threshold of standard BI Platform capabilities for users, aggregated into an intuitive bundle to ensure high user adoption. We include adhoc reporting, report publication and collaboration, dashboards, and analytics capabilities in this definition.

 

Not only does this enable us to ensure that our customers get feature rich dashboarding, real-time reports with drilldowns, alerts, bursting etc., but also ensures that the institutional knowledge that has been painstakingly captured in mapped business processes and reports in a legacy platform are not sacrificed in the move to a modern platform. We also support accessing any data source in mapping your KPI’s, reports and widgets, ensuring that you can extend your reach to all elements that are critical to your decision making.

 

The ‘tech’ part is easy, as the fact that there are so many vendors with solutions available demonstrates. The difficult part is generating useful reports and dashboards quickly, ORBIT Analytics bootstraps you through that process, ensuring that you are quickly making relevant reports available to your users with our pre-built content and migration wizards, that user adoption is high based on ease of use, and that you are quickly realizing a return on that investment you made.

 

Ask me to show you how, at sales@orbitanalytics.com


Written By: Mark Kolanch

Mark Kolanach is a professional problem solver and sales leader for ORBIT Analytics. He has been addressing challenges in the ERP and Business Intelligence space for more years than he cares to count, but still derives great pleasure in working with others to mitigate them.  ‘The fastest route from A to B is not always a straight line’.

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ORBIT Analytics  |   June 19, 2017
Ubiquitous  adjective  /yo͞oˈbikwədəs/ Definition: Present, appearing, or found everywhere. ‘Everywhere’ has been the ‘state of Business Intelligence’ for several years now. Most solution vendors now include some form of reporting (‘BI lite’) in their offering... Learn More ›

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